Monthly Archives: April 2019

A Tale of Two Donut Shops: “Dunking” Into Trademark Troubles

IP Here, IP There…IP Everywhere   

IP is everywhere and affects everyone.  This principle was reinforced when I took Intellectual Property Law with Professor Ho during the Fall 2018 semester.  We regularly had examples in class regarding the many ways IP intersects with everyday life, even including a copyright infringement case involving Kanye West.  There were more examples at the end of the semester when students presented real and/or realistic applications of IP law.  I especially enjoyed working on my final presentation with Jessica Fenton involving a local mom-and-pop donut shop called “Dunk Donuts.”  If you’re thinking that sounds like Dunkin’ Donuts, so were we—and wondering whether this Oak Park donut shop might be liable to the national donut chain.

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PharmD to JD: Working at the Intersection of Science and Law with Carrie Park

Carrie Park is a second-year law student at Loyola University Chicago School of Law with interests in patent and health law. She earned her Doctor of Pharmacy from Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy in 2016 and went on to work as a pharmacist before coming to law school to pursue a career at the intersection of health, pharmacy, and patent law. She is an associate blogger for IP Bytes, serves on the executive boards for IP Law Society and Health Law Society, is a Legal Writing tutor, and is a member of the Annals of Health Law and Life Sciences journal.

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In Pursuit of Patents & Public Health: Finding Both at Loyola

If you know you’re interested in exploring intellectual property (IP) law before even beginning your law school career, you probably have a specific set of interests, distinct from the “average” law student. Something has sparked your curiosity in IP. For me, working at the University of Wisconsin Madison’s technology transfer office, helping professors and university researchers apply for patents, sparked my interest in IP. Around the same time, I was completing a Certificate in Global Health and I became fascinated with the way the law can shape health outcomes in populations of people. For a long time, I thought I would have to choose: patents or public health.

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Slowly But Surely: Closing The Patent Gender Gap

Photo by SLAC

Women’s voices are underrepresented. Recent examples abound in news reporting, Op-Eds, economics, and politics. The patent world is no exception. Women still continue to make up just a small fraction, about 21 percent, of inventors on patent applications, as noted in a recent USPTO Report. However, women have been creating, designing, and innovating for centuries.  So, why is there a gap?


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