Tag:

student athletes

California Legislators’ Actions Speak Louder than NCAA’s Words

In February, California State Senators Nancy Skinner and Steven Bradford presented SB-206, titled the Fair Pay to Play Act, to the California State Senate. Founded on the principle of amateurism, which prohibits paying participants, the NCAA has never allowed intercollegiate student-athletes to earn any form of compensation. This bill seeks to end that prohibition in California and provide student-athletes the rights to their names, images, or likenesses (NIL). In May, the State Senate voted in favor of the bill, 31-5. After the necessary committees reviewed and amended the bill, the State Assembly unanimously passed the Fair Pay to Play Act in a 72-0 vote. Due to the changes, the amended bill went back to the State Senate, where it was unanimously approved, 39-0, on September 11. Governor Gavin Newsom has 30 days to sign, veto, or take no action and allow the bill to become law.  

Operation Varsity Blues Scandal: Should We Be Surprised?”

In March 2019, charges were brought against a number of National College Athletic Association (“NCAA”) athletic department personnel. These officials were found partaking in a fraudulent scheme which allowed affluent young adults to gain admission to elite universities under false pretenses, like fake test scores and phony athletic prowess. The actions of these athletic directors and coaches call into question the effectiveness of the NCAA monitoring and reporting methods to combat misuse and abuse of the athletic system. The NCAA and their institutions must learn from this most recent scandal to identify the problems in athletic compliance that allowed this fraud.

Guest Post: QB Reminds Higher Ed of Regulatory Truth

Last month Josh Rosen, a junior at UCLA who plays quarterback, was quoted by a national sports news website saying, “Football and school don’t go together.” Within hours UCLA’s coach and Stanford’s coach each tried to paint the young man as unenlightened.

Research shows that Rosen is more correct than the coaches admit, but that’s only part of the story. What’s news is that a twenty-year-old—not a university trustee or president, not a U. S. District Court judge or an antitrust lawyer—put his finger on a regulatory reality that higher education may not be able to ignore for much longer.

State Legislature Proposes New Bill to Ensure Athlete Safety

Meghan Murphy Associate Editor Loyola University Chicago School of Law, JD 2018   In January 2017, Connecticut joined the list of states seeking to implement new safety protections for their student-athletes by proposing a new bill, No. 6870, establishing an athletic protection commission.  While the law might be appealing on paper, both the NCAA and …
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NCAA Scholarship Compliance: Financial Freedom or Financial Constraint?

Morgan Slade Associate Editor Loyola University Chicago School of Law, JD 2017   The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has consistently monitored, regulated and investigated scholarship money given to college football players through eligibility regulations. While these scholarships are meant to be a form of financial freedom to players, abiding by NCAA compliance rules imposes …
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Reasons for an Athletics Compliance Department

Gilbert Carrillo Executive Editor Loyola University Chicago School of Law,  JD 2017   The National Collegiate Athletic Association (“NCAA”) is a non-profit organization that regulates athletes in over 1,200 institutions, associations and conferences.  The NCAA also organizes many of the athletic programs of its member schools.  The amount of members in the NCAA requires rules …
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