Tag:

rulemaking

Facebook’s Watching… For Now

Ever since the Facebook and Cambridge Analytica scandal, concerns surrounding data privacy and protection have been growing. Both government agencies and individual users have particularly been concerned on how their data is being collected and used on social media websites such as Facebook. Germany has taken action in response to such concerns and recently took a step against Facebook’s collection of data in a decision that outlawed Facebook’s entire advertisement regime.

Changing Washington Water Quality Standards for Salmon Survival

The state of Washington is proposing new water quality regulations in an effort to encourage growth to the salmon population. The campaign against the dams in the Columbia and Snake river basins has been fought for decades and continually struggles to balance the environmental impacts with industry and energy. This regulation is the newest strategy to attempt to strike a balance between the environmental concerns and the industry concerns. Further, as more attention is given to the dwindling population of killer whales, many are calling this an emergency requiring immediate action. This action is a timely response to the recent calls to action.  

Deregulation of Uranium Mining or: How I Learned to Stop Regulating and Love the Bomb

Compliance professionals all over the country are paying close attention to the Trump administration’s deregulatory campaign. While deregulation in finance has received the most media attention, the uranium mining industry has been a quiet beneficiary of the President’s new regulatory scheme.

How will the Supreme Court’s new rule barring the government from refusing offensive trademarks affect the marketplace?

On June 19, 2017, the Supreme Court, in an 8-0 ruling, found that the government can no longer sensor trademarks on the grounds that they may be offensive. In Matal v. Tam, the Supreme Court Justices found the seventy-one year old rule allowing the government to refuse offensive trademarks to be unconstitutional and to violate free speech and first amendment rights. The justices were unable to agree on exactly what legal standard was to apply to the present case or future cases. The revocation of this seventy-one year old rule that has affected the registration of many marks over the years is bound to have an effect on the future of trademark law and trademark litigation. Immediately following the Supreme Court’s decision, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) was inundated with requests to register offensive trademarks.

JCAR Unanimously Approves Compromise Language on Proposed ICC Rule 412

In a rare ruling on September 12, 2017, the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules (JCAR) unanimously approved revisions to the Illinois Commerce Commission’s (ICC) proposed Part 412 Order. The ICC and members of the Alternative Retail Electric Suppliers (ARES) community negotiated the adopted compromise language. Part 412 of the Illinois Administrative Code, Title 83, Chapter 1, outlines the obligations of retail electric suppliers. Lobbyists for Retail Energy Supply Association (RESA) estimate that this compromise has been up to five years in the making.

Averting Disaster: Building Regulations in the Wake of Hurricane Irma

After Hurricane Irma’s dissipation on September 15, 2017, the residents of Florida can now begin to assess the damage caused by the strongest hurricane making landfall since Katrina in 2005. According to early estimates, Irma has caused over 62 billion dollars in damage. However, amongst the destruction there is a silver lining; the damage caused was significantly limited by building regulations that went into effect in 2002. Homes and buildings that would have otherwise been destroyed by Hurricane Irma were able to survive, and suffered only minor damage.

A Look at Regulation Systems Compliance and Integrity

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) adopted Regulation Systems Compliance and Integrity (“Reg SCI”) to strengthen the technology infrastructure of the U.S. securities markets by imposing new regulatory requirements on SCI entities. The term “SCI entity” includes self-regulatory organizations (“SROs”) such as stock and options exchanges, registered clearing agencies, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”), and the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board (“MSRB”); certain alternative trading systems; disseminators of consolidated market data, such as the Consolidated Tape Association; and certain exempt clearing agencies. The regulatory requirements were designed to reduce the occurrence of systems issues, improve resiliency when systems problems do occur, and to enhance the SEC’s oversight and enforcement of securities market technology infrastructure.

Regulatory Freeze for Review of Pending Rules

Ryan Meade Editor-in-Chief Director of Regulatory Compliance Studies at Loyola University Chicago School of Law   As has been the case for every new Administration since 1981, the President has issued a freeze of final regulations that have not gone into effect.  The instruction usually comes through the Chief of Staff and is referred to …
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The Opening of 2017 in Regulatory Compliance

Ryan Meade Editor-in-Chief Director of Regulatory Compliance Studies at Loyola University Chicago School of Law   In continuing to examine the regulatory Wunderkammer of the Federal Register, the first volume of the year holds some interesting items in its opening pages. Page 1 of the 81st volume starts out somberly with Executive Order 13757, “Taking …
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The Closing of 2016 in Regulatory Compliance

Ryan Meade Editor-in-Chief Director of Regulatory Compliance Studies at Loyola University Chicago School of Law   Early before dawn on the last day of the 2016 Federal Register, 19 pistachio handlers in the United States were greeted with an easier compliance burden for 2017.  But we’ll return to that later. Why January 1 starts the new year is a bit …
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