Archive for the ‘Email’ Category

3rd Annual Information and Technology Showcase

Friday, January 26th, 2018

The 3rd Annual Loyola Information & Technology Showcase will be held on Thursday, February 15th from 9:30am to 3:15pm in the Damen Student Center. Come learn about existing library and technology resources through breakout sessions or visit some resource tables.  There are returning vendors such as Top Hat, Panopto, and SimplyMap, as well as new ones including VoiceThread, and Zoom. This event is open to all faculty, staff, and students. Lunch and afternoon refreshments will be provided to all registered participants. For more information and to register for the event, please visit the event page at http://www.luc.edu/its/techshowcase/.

2nd Annual Information and Technology Showcase

Tuesday, January 24th, 2017

The 2nd Annual Loyola Information & Technology Showcase will be held on Thursday, February 23rd from 9am to 1pm in the Information Commons and adjacent Donovan Reading Room. Come learn about existing library and technology resources through breakout sessions or visit some resource tables.  There are returning vendors such as Top Hat, Panopto, and SimplyMap, as well as new ones including CDW-G, VoiceThread, and Zoom. This event is open to all faculty, staff, and students. Continental breakfast and a box lunch will be provided to all registered participants. For more information and to register for the event, please visit the event page at http://www.luc.edu/its/techshowcase/.

 

Protect your Sensitive Data from Phishing Attacks

Friday, September 16th, 2011

Did You Know?
Loyola University Chicago blocks over one million spam messages per day.

What is Phishing?
Phishing is an attempt to steal sensitive information, such as your social security number or passwords, by posing as a trusted organization or person. Phishers are known for using this information for identity theft and other fraudulent acts.

What do Phishing attacks look like?
Phishing is most commonly attempted via an email that will claim to come from a trusted organization, such as Loyola University Chicago, your bank or your credit card company. There are two common mechanisms that phishers use to steal your sensitive information:

  • 1.  They will ask you to respond to an email with your sensitive  information.
  • 2.  They will ask you to follow links to update your sensitive  information.
    • a.  You will appear to be providing your information to the trusted company, while in fact you will be providing that information to a phisher.

What are some types of Phishing attacks?

  • “Spear Phishing” targets a particular person or organization into revealing confidential company information by impersonating the organization, or members of the organization.
  • “Whaling” specifically targets senior management into divulging confidential information.

How can I prevent becoming a victim of Phishing attacks?
No legitimate organization will ever ask you for your password!

Do not click on any links sent via email, as these may take you to a web site that places malicious software on your computer. Instead, enter the address that you know is legitimate into your browser.

For example:  Instead of clicking on the URL received in an email (such as http://www.123citi-bank-usa.com/update/yourcredentials.html), open up Firefox and navigate to Citibank’s known website: www.citibank.com.

Call the institution to inquire on the matter instead of following the link. In addition, refrain from calling any numbers listed in the email, and instead, use a number for the organization that you know is legitimate.

If you are prompted to enter your username and password to a site that appears legitimate, enter both incorrectly.  A fraudulent site will accept the incorrect username and password while a legitimate site will not. Also make sure to check that the SSL certificate is valid and error free. Refer to the following link and steps to validate the sites SSL certificate, http://info.ssl.com/article.aspx?id=10068.

If you do provide personal or sensitive information to a malicious site, immediately contact the appropriate institution with the details surrounding the occurrence.

Where can I send potential Phishing attacks to be processed?
LUC Staff, faculty, and students should report any regular phishing emails or sites to spam@mailfoundry.com.

If you have received a Spear Phishing or Whaling attack, please forward it to DataSecurity@luc.edu.

Where can I find more info?
Visit http://www.luc.edu/uiso/protect_yourself.shtml for additional security tips.

Secure your Gmail

Thursday, July 30th, 2009

1X1When you take care of your banking online, your bank’s website uses a protocol called https to secure your financial data.  If you login to unencrypted wireless networks, i.e. at coffee shops or airports, https will keep your email encrypted so someone sharing the network can’t read it. If you use Gmail, you have the option to always leave https on to keep your email protected each time you access it.  By default this option isn’t selected so you will need go to your Gmail settings and choose Always use https next to Browser Connection then click Save Changes.  Keep in mind that https may make Gmail a little slower; you can always turn this feature off if you are using a secure network.

https_pref.png

Source – The Official Gmail Blog:  Making Security Easier

How to Send Huge Email Files

Thursday, February 26th, 2009

Have you ever tried sending digital pictures or video files or music files to a friend or family member, only to be stopped by the ISP (or your friendly employer) because it was too big? At Loyola we limit both inbound and outbound email attachments to 20 megabytes (20mb), which means the complete size of the email cannot exceed 20 mb, including the body of the email and other attachments. Yahoo and Hotmail limit your attachments to 10mb. With Gmail, the maximum attachment size has increased to 20mb; however many webmail services won’t accept the larger attachment size and your email will get bounced back. In many ways, they are doing this for your own good – they don’t want you sending huge attachments because they don’t want to increase the chances that you will be passing along viruses to your friends and family. However, limits are inconvenient, aren’t they?

Now through a free site, DropSend, you can send files up to 2 gigabytes (that’s 2048MB) securely (it’s encrypted), safely, and easily. Just go to the site, enter your email address, your recipient’s address, and the file you want to send. Your recipient will receive a link where he/she can download it from the Internet. It’s that simple. You don’t flood your friend’s mailbox with huge files, yet you’re able to send out your pictures, video, and music as you wish. But remember that this is a third party resource – use this at your own discretion. We don’t advise you to send out top-secret files or anything. We have also found that it is best to be patient with this site. Large files take a few minutes to upload, even with a speedy Internet connection.

Other similar services:

Send This File:
http://www.sendthisfile.com/

How to Zip Multiple Files

Thursday, February 19th, 2009

1X1Sending a picture or a document as an email attachment is an easy way to share files between computers. But what if you have many files that you’d like to send, or an entire folder? Well, you could attach each item individually in an email; however this solution can be time-consuming for you and cumbersome for the recipient to download fifteen separate files. Zipping your files makes it possible to have multiple files squeezed down to one smaller file that can easily be sent via email. Also, if you have a large folder that includes media, such as audio or video, zipping reduces size and saves space. Many people don’t realize how easy it is to zip files in Windows XP and in Mac OS X. Support for zipping is built right in to both of these operating systems!

PC Users

1. If you want to zip multiple files, either create a folder that contains all of the files or highlight the batch of files.

2. Right-click on the file(s) or folder you wish to compress.

3. From the drop-down menu, click Send To > Compressed (zipped) folder.

Windows Menu

4. Now you can attach the .zip file in an email. Keep in mind that at Loyola we limit both inbound and outbound email attachments to 20 megabytes (20mb), which means the complete size of the email cannot exceed 20 mb, including the body of the email and other attachments.

5. To open a zipped file, double-click the .zip file then click on Extract All Files.

Mac Users

1. If you want to zip multiple files, either create a folder that contains all of the files or highlight the batch of files.

2..Control + Click on the file(s) or folder you wish to compress.

3. From the pop-up menu, click Create Archive then the zip file will appear in whichever folder you are working in (i.e. your desktop or documents folder).

Mac Menu

4. Now you can attach the .zip file in an email. Keep in mind that at Loyola we limit both inbound and outbound email attachments to 20 megabytes (20mb), which means the complete size of the email cannot exceed 20 mb, including the body of the email and other attachments.

5. To open an archived file, simply double-click the Archive.zip file.

GroupWise Junk Mail Handling

Thursday, October 2nd, 2008

For this week’s Tech Tip, we offer important information about the GroupWise email client. The Junk Mail Handling feature in GroupWise enables users to decide what to do with unwanted Internet items including e-mails, appointments, or tasks that are sent to your GroupWise e-mail address. This includes all e-mail, appointments, or tasks where the sender’s address is in the form of name@domain.com, name@domain.org, etc..

Junk Mail Handling does not apply to internal e-mail, appointments, or tasks. Internal items are e-mails, appointments, or tasks where the sender is part of your GroupWise system and the “From” field shows only the name of the sender, not an Internet address as explained above. However, Loyola email addresses that are addressed with the Loyola domain name or the Loyola email domain luc.edu may be added to the Block or Junk Lists in error by an email user.

If a Loyola email address or the Loyola email domain luc.edu appears on your Block or Junk Lists you will be at risk of not receiving email from other Faculty, Staff, and Students on the Loyola GroupWise System.

How to Check your Block and Junk Lists

To ensure that you do not have (username@luc.edu) email addresses or the luc.edu domain on your Block or Junk Lists, go to the Tools Menu select Junk Mail Handling… Click on the tabs to select the Block List or Junk List. Search both the Block and Junk lists for any (username@luc.edu) addresses and the luc.edu domain. If you locate a luc.edu address you will need to redefine it from the list. To redefine the address or domain, select the item from the list then click the Move to Trust button at the top right corner of the Junk Mail Handling window.

For assistance with Junk Mail Handling:

  1. Call: 773-508-7190 (or on campus 4-4444)
  2. E-mail: helpdesk@luc.edu