Category: Internships

What Makes a Good Resume: 101

What Makes a Good Resume: 101

 

A cartoon hand shakes and quivers while holding a resume.

Many of us may need to start working on our resumes whether it is for a job, an internship, applying to a school, etc. Now what is the function of a resume you may ask? It is a concise summary of your education, work/volunteer/internship experiences and other qualifications relevant to your audience’s needs. Employers use resumes as a first impression and will use it to compare you to other candidates. NOTE: a good resume does not guarantee you a job, it just allows you to be considered. A resume demonstrates the skills and capabilities that the reader would value and it is essential for you to demonstrate your abilities and is showcases a sense of direction in your career.

How to layout and format a good resume:

There are a few basic resume types but lets focus on some things that are particularly helpful –

  • It is recommended to format chronologically so that the reader is able to see organization qualities as well as being able to follow your experience.
  • Aim to fit your resume on 1 page – unless you have more experiences that are relevant to the job, you should limit it to one page because it is a general overview of your skills and capabilities.
  • AVOID using templates as a basis for your resume because sometimes they can be difficult to alter and limits you from standing out if your resume looks just like everyone else’s. (Remember, the person reading your resume is most likely reading soooooo many others.)
  • Use CAPS, bolding, underlining, bullets, and indentation to direct the reader’s attention and separate different sections of the resume.
  • Do NOT use graphics or unusual fonts and colors to “dress up” your resume. It doesn’t look professional and you need to limit your space as well because you only have 1 page remember.
  • Use margins between 0.5″ – 1.0″ which leaves enough blank space on the page so that the document is comfortable to read and enough margin to allow for different viewing software and printers.
  • It would be better to save your file as a pdf before submitting electronically so that it preserves the format.

 

Sections within your resume:

 

Contact information

  • Include your name and email address as well as the phone number and street address you would prefer to be contacted at

Introductory Statement 

  • “Objective” statements are often considered awkward, obsolete, or unnecessary.
  • If you use a summary statement, make sure that your experiences live up to that statement.

Education

  • List degrees in reverse chronological order
  • List the official names of the school you have attended
  • You may list your GPA if it is strong
  • Course Work descriptions: which can include honors and awards (scholarships/fellowships)
  • Study abroad – list school(s), location, dates

Work Experiences 

  • List experiences in reverse-chronological order.
  • Show the name of the organization, your title, and dates of involvement.
  • Be consistent in your formatting of each experience
  • Use bulleted phrases to describe each experience which should demonstrate skills and capabilities – consider how your experiences demonstrate core work skills (communication/interpersonal skills, organization/time management/leadership, analytical/problem solving skills.
  • Use a professional and active voice

Internship, Co-curricular and Volunteer Experience 

  • List experiences that involve leadership or organizational responsibilities
  • Format the same way and be sure to demonstrate core work skills

Skills

  • This section is optional but this includes additional language skills you possess or certifications/licenses
  • This can also include technology or soft ware skills that are relevant to your career.

 

Hopefully this helps many of you! If you need additional guidance, refer to Loyola’s Career Development Center – they have many available resources, including sample resumes/cover letters!

 

Have No Fear, Resume Tips Are Here!

Have No Fear, Resume Tips Are Here!

 

It is that time where many of us are either beginning to apply to graduate school, medical school, a job, etc.!

Many of us may need to start working on our resumes whether it is for a job, an internship, applying to a school, etc. Now what is the function of a resume you may ask? It is a concise summary of your education, work/volunteer/internship experiences and other qualifications relevant to your audience’s needs. Employers use resumes as a first impression and will use it to compare you to other candidates. NOTE: a good resume does not guarantee you a job, it just allows you to be considered. A resume demonstrates the skills and capabilities that the reader would value and it is essential for you to demonstrate your abilities and is showcases a sense of direction in your career.

How to layout and format a good resume:

There are a few basic resume types but lets focus on some things that are particularly helpful –

  • It is recommended to format chronologically so that the reader is able to see organization qualities as well as being able to follow your experience.
  • Aim to fit your resume on 1 page – unless you have more experiences that are relevant to the job, you should limit it to one page because it is a general overview of your skills and capabilities.

  • AVOID using templates as a basis for your resume because sometimes they can be difficult to alter and limits you from standing out if your resume looks just like everyone else’s. (Remember, the person reading your resume is most likely reading soooooo many others.)
  • Use CAPS, bolding, underlining, bullets, and indentation to direct the reader’s attention and separate different sections of the resume.
  • Do NOT use graphics or unusual fonts and colors to “dress up” your resume. It doesn’t look professional and you need to limit your space as well because you only have 1 page remember.
  • Use margins between 0.5″ – 1.0″ which leaves enough blank space on the page so that the document is comfortable to read and enough margin to allow for different viewing software and printers.
  • It would be better to save your file as a pdf before submitting electronically so that it preserves the format.

 

Sections within your resume:

 

Contact information

  • Include your name and email address as well as the phone number and street address you would prefer to be contacted at

Introductory Statement 

  • “Objective” statements are often considered awkward, obsolete, or unnecessary.
  • If you use a summary statement, make sure that your experiences live up to that statement.

Education

  • List degrees in reverse chronological order
  • List the official names of the school you have attended
  • You may list your GPA if it is strong
  • Course Work descriptions: which can include honors and awards (scholarships/fellowships)
  • Study abroad – list school(s), location, dates

Work Experiences 

  • List experiences in reverse-chronological order.
  • Show the name of the organization, your title, and dates of involvement.
  • Be consistent in your formatting of each experience
  • Use bulleted phrases to describe each experience which should demonstrate skills and capabilities – consider how your experiences demonstrate core work skills (communication/interpersonal skills, organization/time management/leadership, analytical/problem solving skills.
  • Use a professional and active voice

Internship, Co-curricular and Volunteer Experience 

  • List experiences that involve leadership or organizational responsibilities
  • Format the same way and be sure to demonstrate core work skills

Skills

  • This section is optional but this includes additional language skills you possess or certifications/licenses
  • This can also include technology or soft ware skills that are relevant to your career.

 

Hopefully this helps many of you! If you need additional guidance, refer to Loyola’s Career Development Center – they have many available resources, including sample resumes/cover letters!

 

 

Such a ‘Bler: Career Week 2019! | My Summer Internship Hunt! (Part 2)

Such a ‘Bler: Career Week 2019! | My Summer Internship Hunt! (Part 2)

 I walked in this Tuesday with my bright mustard yellow resume and interactive online portfolio. I was confident – I had been prepping for this review all Summer after learning from the previous year’s Career Week Workshops. However, I knew there was much left to learn.

The extravagance began with a panel discussion on good business writing and other crucial things to keep in mind when striving to put your best foot forward. The three guest speakers were informative, funny and inspiring. I can honestly say that I’ve even met the individual I hope I will have the honor to mentor me. But I got his card (!) and also gave out my business card for the first time – it was a very official conversation.

The next day continued with the circulation of our resumes through a group of professionals both from the more corporate and creative world. I also ran them through my website, or online portfolio and it was interesting to see the different insights. Overall, I need to be more specific with my information according to each desired internship, but my overall brand received many thumbs up!

The Career Week finishes with a a Networking Night and Job Fair but I am already learning so much and feel much more confident after 2 evenings. I can honestly not thank the School of Communications and Quinlan School of Business enough for such a helpful string of events.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to have my complimentary headshot taken and get my Linkedin ready.

Here’s my freshman photo from last year’s Career Week:

 

HEY, I ALSO MAKE VIDEOS!

HERE’S THE SUCH A ‘BLER PLAYLIST:

 

Rambler Success: What to do Before Graduation

Rambler Success: What to do Before Graduation

“What’s next?” is the question that many recent college graduates have on their minds. There are many routes that one can take after receiving their diploma. Some decide to enter the work force, and hopefully pay down that college debt. Others, go onto graduate school to grab a master’s degree. There are also those who want to take a mental/physical break and travel for a bit. Whatever, your calling, it is always a good idea to have experience up your sleeve. This is where where these resources come into play.

Resumes: Resumes are textual photographs that tell your prospective employer your education, skills, work experiences, and a sprinkle of personal facts about you. Whether you have a ton of experience or you are still trying to find your niche, it is important for one put together their resume. Do you need help putting together what’s important and what would be better to be left out? You are on luck, on campus we have a service called the Career Development Center (in the Sullivan Center) where you can go to help you in your resume writing process. In addition they provide information on how to write a proper cover letter, how to interview well, and other business needs/questions that you might have.

LinkedIn: Often referred to as the Facebook for professionals, LinkedIn is a social networking site where jobs opportunities, employers, etc. go to connect and establish professional relationships with each other. Here, you can find people from business professionals (CEOs and Managers) to salespeople, professors, marketers, and more. As a tip, I would recommend connecting with your professors, friends, coworkers, and Loyola alums. They might just help you out on your job search.

Jobs on Campus: Want to feel what it is like to adult and have a job? Through Loyola’s job search engine, RamblerLink, you can find jobs that will allow you to find jobs both on or off campus. You can also find some job opportunities from pamphlets and flyers around the school. Whether you want to be a Peer Advisor, a person who works at the Undergraduate Admissions office, or an assistant for the Financial Aid office; there is always something that you can get involved in. These jobs will help you branch out your network and give you the work experience you need.

Job Fairs: Throughout the school year, Loyola brings in employers from around the Chicagoland area. Most Loyola schools have their own: School of Communication, Business, Social Work, etc. It is during these fairs where you get the opportunity to talk to prospective employers to talk about internship availabilities to entry level positions. All you need to bring are your resumes, business casual attire, your student ID, and a confident smile on your face. Who knows? You might just be offered an internship or a job! If not, just keep pushing through.

Image converted using ifftoany

Bring On the Opportunities

Bring On the Opportunities

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Being a college students means being constantly busy and constantly handed new opportunities (or so we all hope), and this isn’t a bad thing. Opportunities are the gateway to successful careers and lives, but there is a point at which you run out of time to accept these opportunities and their implied commitments. This is a problem that I am facing, not for the first time all together, but for the first time on my own.

This year I have definitely been blessed with all the opportunities I have been given, but I have started to realize that I’m coming to the end of my availability to do anything else. The realization came the moment I opened up my instagram app and realized that I had five accounts logged in on my phone that I was working on or with or ran myself. It was that moment when I said, Hey, this actually is A LOT. Don’t get me wrong, I love what I do. My work on social media both for the school, myself, and my sorority brings me so much joy, but the problem with working on social media is that you’re working all the time. Social media doesn’t stop, so I’m constantly posting or liking or monitoring something! Maybe I overbooked myself.

The last two weeks I’ve been stressing out more than usual, and missing assignments, something that I never like to do. Maybe you noticed I haven’t posted on this blog much, this is why. But I don’t want to live behind the excuse of overbooking myself, and neither should you. That’s why I’m taking all these things as another opportunity, one to learn where my balance is. These four years are all about finding yourself and finding out who you’re going to be for the rest of your life. Realizing where your limits are and where you can improve your time management/ procrastinating is just as much a part of this as picking a career path.

The biggest learning experience that I’ve had from this just over the past few weeks, is that I have the ability to manage a lot of things at once, but if I don’t stay organized it will all turn into one major mess. This year more than ever I have been writing things down. If it’s not written in my planner it’s probably not going to happen. Maybe you got away with just remembering it in high school or even Freshman year of college but, once life starts to move a little faster you’re going to thank god for your planner too.

Another important scheduling and time management tidbit I’ve learned, is consistency. If you do the same thing over and over again, it becomes a habit. Going to bed and waking up at the same time can seem like a drag, especially on the weekends. When it gets to be mid-semester and waking up to go downtown isn’t fun anymore though, you’ll be glad you wake up before your alarm.

Taking on more is scary and exciting at the same time. It’s the feeling of moving forward and learning hands on, and I know that I am thankful everyday for the opportunities I have had this semester, but it can be challenging. It’s okay to feel stressed out, even by something you love. Don’t forget to take breaks, and eat cookies, and when you feel like you don’t have time for anything anymore take a deep breath and tell yourself you can do this, because guess what, YOU CAN DO THIS!

To Job or Not To Job

To Job or Not To Job

Career_Fair

 

Loyola can sometimes seem to have a reputation as being a posh private university, and while it’s true, we are a private university, not all of us have super “posh” backgrounds. Finances are a real issue that most Loyola students deal with everyday whether they talk about it or not. So when is the right time to get a job? Where do you get a job? And most importantly, how do you get a job?

The perfect job is different for everyone. Some students can cope with a part time retail job downtown in addition to class, other’s find it easier to snag an on campus job. Your first stop no matter what should be Ramblerlink, this Loyola run online job source is a great way to connect with jobs and internships that work for you. All you have to do is log in with your Loyola ID, answer a few questions, upload a resume and you have access! On campus jobs are all on Ramblerlink and are a great way to stay close to home, meet other ramblers, and make a few extra bucks. Jobs on campus include, working as a desk receptionist, working at the IC desk, or the desk in Halas, and much much more. You can also visit Loyola job fairs, check out the events calendar and find out when the next one is too start your journey!

So maybe you’re a freshman and you haven’t got a great resume (or any resume at all) yet. Don’t worry, we have resources for that too! If you don’t know exactly where to begin when it comes to resume writing, stop by the career center, click here to find out more!

“But I don’t want an on campus job or an internship, I want to work at Topshop or Victoria Secret!” Don’t worry, I have advice for you too! There are tons of students at Loyola who have off campus jobs in retail or as hosts/hostesses or waiters around the city! When it comes to finding these jobs you’re going to have to do a little more work on your own. Take a trip to the career center to get your resume in order and then hit the web. Your one stop shop for jobs is going to be online. Check out the website of a store or restaurant you want to work at and scroll down to the bottom of the homepage, there’s usually a link titled ‘careers’ that will take you to their hiring site. In my experience, you don’t hear back from a lot of the places you apply, but sometimes you get lucky. Applying to stores in particular is a waiting game, so make sure your resume is killer, even if you don’t have any experience.

Juggling school and work is hard, finding someone older who has experience with it is a great way to decide if you can do it too! Make sure you don’t overbook yourself, even if it seems doable in theory sometimes work and school can be too much to handle. Keep an open mind and an open schedule and see where things go! Happy job searching!

The Million-Dollar Question: Food At Loyola

The Million-Dollar Question: Food At Loyola

Dining-Hall

Believe you me, I toured a lot of colleges when I was in high school. Being led around by the tour guides like some sort of wayward puppy, I’ve asked a lot of different questions. You know, the important ones – and the not-so important ones. “Why did you pick this college?” “What’s there to do around here?” “Would you say the school spirit is high or low?” “How often does the ice-cream truck come by?”

(I’m not ashamed of the last one. The answer was, tragically, not often.)

Here’s one you might not have thought of – and if you did, it’s hard to get a satisfactory answer. “How is the food?”

I vividly remember my older brother coming home from college his first semester and bemoaning his single dining hall and student center with only Chik-fil-a, Panda Express, and Express Pita as other, actually edible options. And even those get old after a while. He was out of Dining Dollars, spent on avoiding the dining hall as best he could. He was sick of it all.

But he doesn’t attend Loyola.

Here, we have not one, but three Dining Halls, each unique for what they serve on any given day of the week, at any time of the day. You could go to Damen for some lasagna maybe, or de Nobili for make-your-own pizza, or Simpson on Wing Wednesday for some chicken wings in a sauce of your choosing. Or perhaps you want some fried rice and orange chicken, so you go to Damen, or you really want some chicken nuggets – de Nobili, but Simpson has a taco bar that is always prime. They also strive to always have a vegan option and to rotate through ethnic/cultural areas like the Mediterranean, East Asia, South Asia, and so on. How can you possibly keep all the options straight?

There’s an app for that. (No, really, there is!)

I won’t tell you the food never gets old – you could go to the same Dining Hall every day of the week if you want, and you could eat the same thing every day. But with this many options, why would you? All the Dining Halls have make-your-own-salads and sandwich bars, all of them have (hopefully) working ice cream machines and soup. It all depends on you.

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There’s also wondrously fun monthly events like cookie-decorating day, hot apple cider and hot chocolate bars, and cupcakes for those born in the month. The cookie-decorating is especially great because the cookies are top-notch.

Then again, if you still decide you need a break from the large, open sitting areas and big windows from which you can observe the world, Loyola’s still got you covered. You’ve also got Dining Dollars and Rambler Bucks that can be spent at Bleeker Street, Damen Food Court, Engrained Cafe, Ireland’s, Nina’s, Connections Cafe, Lu’s, and our coffeeshops – and that’s just on campus!

‘Off-campus’ food locations are less than five minutes away, and they include Subway, Pita Pit, Potbelly’s, Five Guys, Felice’s, Cafe Descartes, Flaco Taco, Epic Burger, Metropolis Coffee, and Papa John’s, not to mention local hangout The Coffee Shop.

I’m not saying that each food court is five-star dining all the time, but it’s certainly not slop and it’s much better than anything I tried at all those other schools. I don’t dread eating and I enjoy a lot of the food! The dining hall workers try really hard to spice things up for you and there’s always a variety to choose from.

Photo Feb 08, 11 28 40 AM

 

I recommend Damen’s meat loaf and potatoes, encourage you to give de Nobili’s pizza a try (my favorite is to make bbq hawaiian pizzas), and definitely, you can’t miss Simpson’s cinnamon sticks!

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Career Week 2016: Resumes in Review

Career Week 2016: Resumes in Review

Your ticket to the industry, a piece of paper listing your greatest accomplishments, or your rite of passage to adulthood. No matter what you call it, a resume is a vital part of entering “real life”. Something that, for me, is approaching more quickly than I’d like to admit.

Considering the necessity of a good resume when entering the workforce it was a no-brainer for me to attend the resume workshop, an event hosted through Loyola’s School of Communication Career Week.

On Wednesday, 30 communications professionals joined students at the Water Tower Campus’ Lewis Towers for the “Resumes that Pop to the Top” event. Students had the chance to meet with several professionals for resume critiques and career advice. The workshop was “round robin style”, which allowed us about ten minutes with the professionals we met before rotating to someone new.

Prior to the workshop I had thoroughly convinced myself that my resume would need to be completely thrown out and started over based on the critique I received. Thankfully, I was wrong. I had the pleasure of meeting with three different professionals, all of whom offered really helpful advice for not just my resume, but for the start of my career. In general the reactions to my resume were positive, which allowed me to take a huge sigh of relief.

The most common criticism I received was to change the order of my resume, so my most recent experience was showcased first. A piece I hope to add to my resume is a personal statement of sorts at the top. A few short sentences that provide insight into my personality rather than my technical skills is something I can only hope will “pop my resume to the top”.

Now that I’ve reorganized my resume, changed some sentence structure, and gained some insight into the professional world, I feel far more confident in my resume. I was, however, reminded that a strong resume is only one piece of the puzzle and I’ll need an impressive cover letter and interview to complete the picture. Although my resume is solid for now, it is a living document that will even need updating by next fall. But I’ll worry about that when the time comes.

For now, I’ll be grateful for the advice and continue to ask for reviews from others at every opportunity I’m given.

 

Full-time Everything, All the Time

Full-time Everything, All the Time

Growing up as millennials, we were taught that hard work is the only way to achieve our goals and get ahead. The pressure to fight for what we want is all we know. For us, there is no other option besides giving 110 percent to be The Best. So, every semester, I, like so many of my peers, fill my plate to the brim with classes and extracurricular activities, striving to create a portfolio that showcases me in a stellar nutshell. The most recent, and one of my favorite, additions to my long list of activities is my new job: working at a global clothing retail chain that has 1,600 stores worldwide and more than 40 stores in the U.S., but is new to the Mid-West.

 

Joining the Mag-Mile Uniqlo team as a sales associate is arguably one of the best decisions I have ever made. I am lucky to have trained as a member of the new flagship store’s grand opening crew. Seeing many of the in’s and out’s that go into launching a 60,000-square-foot, three-floor store ‘from scratch’ allowed me a rare glance into the incredible effort that goes into creating a successful business, down to the finest nuances of customer service.

 

In line with the millennial theme that “nothing good comes without hard work,” founder Tadashi Yanai is dead set on making Uniqlo the number one clothing brand in the world by the year 2020. Hence, every employee is pushed to give 100 percent in everything that they do. The new showcase location is so expansive, it takes 85 seconds to ride the giant escalator from bottom to top. Not surprisingly, we employees have been given a directive to walk with a sense of urgency while completing tasks.

 

In addition to taking eighteen credits, attending senate meetings for student government and chapter meetings for my sorority, plus working twenty hours week, takes toll on one’s body very quickly. Yet, I love working, especially at a store that is the epitome of the way I want to live my life: clean, efficient, and organized down to a T. Despite the long hours, I always look forward to going into work, even when I worked thirty hours in three days during opening weekend.

 

All things considered, life isn’t so bad. When I roll out of bed at 5am every Thursday morning and put on my ROTC uniform in preparation for the day, I merely need to remind myself that anything less than everything is not enough.

30 Reasons Why We LOVE Loyola

30 Reasons Why We LOVE Loyola

 

With Valentine’s Day approaching and everyone talking about love, it only seemed appropriate to talk about what Loyola staff and current students have to say about their relationship with Loyola.

Here are 30 reasons staff and students love Loyola:

  1. The ability to go abroad to the Rome center. – Ellen
  2. The incorporation of social justice into academics. – Judy Kyrkos
  3. The small campus feel with access to the city. – Lexy Rux
  4. Being in Chicago. – Maggie
  5. The small class sizes; it really feels like you get one-on-one time with the professors. – Patrick
  6. Being on a beautiful campus with access to downtown. – Adam Buller
  7. Living in Mertz and the chicken tenders from Damen Dining Hall. – Katie
  8. The sense of community. – Ricky Mott
  9. The beautiful campus and social justice focus in all of my classes. – Kara
  10. The small campus feel. – Shaniqua
  11. How the core classes make us a well-rounded person. – Elise
  12. How self-aware the student body is. I’ve never encountered an impolite person on campus. – John
  13. The community feel, size of campus, friendly/welcoming environment, and small class size. – Christy Vargas
  14. How there are Vegan and gluten-free options in the dining halls. – Sarah
  15. Dynamics of taking class on the lake shore campus and downtown. It’s nice to experience the best of both worlds. – Claire
  16. Class sizes, pretty campus, and nice/passionate professors. – Carlee
  17. Diverse community. – Samantha
  18. Friendly environment on campus. – Brittney
  19. Approachable teachers who seem to enjoy their jobs and always want to help you do your best. – Gabby
  20. The view of the lake. – Shannon
  21. I feel safe on campus. – Adrian
  22. Loyola has always given me the opportunity to succeed. – Aaron Brunmeier
  23. The architecture of campus. – Brian
  24. The sense of community. – Aliyah Jervier
  25. I love that Loyola offers something for anyone and everyone who attends so that they can be a part of something and feel included. – Hiba Abbas
  26. I LOVE that every time I step outside and see our beautiful campus I get excited for my day no matter how stressful it is. – Lucy Mooney
  27. I love that Loyola has so many things to offer to their students. Whether it be information on study abroad, fairs talking about feminism, or tutoring for certain classes, Loyola does an amazing job providing us with tools for success. I think that since there are so many resources offered, any type of student can feel like this school is a perfect fit for them. – Katherine Weir
  28. Loyola fosters education both inside and outside the classroom enabling YOU to grow immensely. Upon graduating from Loyola in the spring of 2015, Loyola has taught me that the aim of my education is not the facts, but rather of values. –Joe Sadofsky
  29. How connected students are to the Loyola community. – Callie Short
  30. How Loyola shares the same values as myself. – Alyson Crutchfield

Happy Valentine’s Day from Loyola University Chicago!