The Plight of Adjunct Faculty at US Colleges and Universities

Posted on: October 9th, 2013 1 Comment

Prajinta Sthapitanonda-Pesqueda looks at the recent, tragic death of 83-year-old Margaret Mary Vojtko, a long-time adjunct professor at Duquesne University, and how difficult it is for adjunct faculty to survive on typical salaries.

“Research on adjunct working conditions paints a picture of inequality between them and their tenure-track counterparts. A 2010 survey of non-tenure-track faculty members by the Coalition on the Academic Workforce showed low median compensation rates for adjunct faculty, at $2,700 per three-credit course, with little, if any, compensation based on credentials and minimal support for work or professional development outside the classroom. (At four courses per semester, that’s $21,600 annually, compared to starting tenure-track salaries that average $66,000, according to data from the American Association of University Professors.)

But adjunct faculty now make up the majority of the higher education work force. As recently as 1969, 78 percent of instructional staff comprised tenured or tenure-track professors, with adjunct faculty making up the rest, according to information from the Pullias Center for Higher Education at the University of Southern California. By 2009, the figures had nearly flipped, with a third of faculty tenured or on the tenure track and two-thirds ineligible for tenure. Of those non-tenure-track positions, just 19 percent were full-time.”


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One Response

  1. Thank you for this honest assessment!