Category:

Drugs & Devices

Medical Marijuana and Maintaining FDA Compliance

Regardless of opinions on legalization, many people accept the idea that medical marijuana, and more specifically CBD, can be a powerful treatment for many medical conditions. However, there has been one major roadblock: the FDA. According to the FDA, more than 90 warning letters over the past 10 years have been released to companies claiming that their cannabis products cure various symptoms. The most common is the claim that marijuana prevents or treats cancer. In 2017, as the medical properties of marijuana continue to be trumpeted to the general public, the FDA is still working to protect the public by issuing warning letters to marijuana providers making unsubstantiated claims.

Powdered Caffeine – Friend or Foe?

Most Americans consume caffeine regularly. High amounts of caffeine are found in a wide range of drinks including sodas, coffee, and energy drinks. Like most things, caffeine is safe for most people as long as it is consumed in moderation. The dosage size of powdered caffeine has come under scrutiny mostly due to its potency. The Food and Drug Administration has notified powdered caffeine distributors that their products are potentially dangerous to consumers as they have the possibility of causing serious adverse health consequences, including death. The FDA’s notices required powdered caffeine distributors to accurately label and market their products ensuring they are in compliance with the law. Four of the five distributors removed their products from the market following the notices, and the fifth distributor no longer markets to consumers.

A Changing Gray Market Post Lexmark

On May 30, 2017, the Supreme Court issued a decision in Impression Prods., Inc. v. Lexmark Int’l, Inc. finding 8-0 to disallow post-sale restrictions on goods, and 7-1 on the matter of international exhaustion. The Court’s holding reinforced the doctrine of international exhaustion for patents, finding that the first authorized sale exhausts the patent holder’s rights to block importation. In theory, one could now legally purchase pharmaceuticals overseas at cheaper prices and import them to the United States.

FDA Nutrition Facts Label: Will the New Administration Approve a Change?

On May 20, 2016 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a new nutrition facts label for packaged foods, the first significant makeover in twenty years. The new label reflects new scientific information regarding our diets; such as the link between diet and chronic diseases like obesity and heart disease. This new label comes after three years of negotiations and proposed improvements between the FDA, scientists, and lobbying groups. Those in favor of the changes have pointed out that the old nutrition fact labels had no information to help consumers determine if they were complying with the U.S. Dietary Guidelines’ recommendations and that the labels did not reflect the necessary nutrients per day. These changes affect manufacturers as well as consumers. Manufacturers are not only worried about having to reformulate their foods, but also having to reconsider their ability to make certain nutrient content claims in advertisements and on packaging. Companies will also have to consider additional costs associated with packaging design, development of new artwork, regulatory consultation and review to ensure label compliance, reconsideration of inconsistent advertising, and human costs associated with potential new operating procedures and training to ensure compliance with the new regulations. In response to complaints from manufacturers, consumer advocates are reminding the White House Administration to remember that the FDA’s mission is protect the health of the American people not the bottom line of manufacturers.

Compliance Spotlight: Dominique Vittori, Abbott Laboratories

Dominique Vittori is a Regulatory Affairs Associate for Abbott Laboratories working within Abbott Diagnostics Division. Abbott Laboratories is a worldwide healthcare company that is most known for pharmaceutical development but eventually branched out to include medical devices, nutritional products and research-based drugs/pharmaceuticals. Ms. Vittori earned her Bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois, where she majored Molecular and Cellular Biology. Ms. Vittori sought a career in compliance because of the opportunity to put her background and expertise in the sciences to use in a corporate setting, and has been most rewarded by the ability to see the tangible results of her work at Abbott Labs.

The following is an interview with Ms. Vittori where she gives an inside look into her daily life as a compliance professional.

History of Emergency Prescription Fulfillment Policies in the Wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma

In the midst of a natural disaster people gather their children and pets, try to locate a temporary home, and worry what situation they may come home to. The first things people think to grab have nothing to do with their prescription drugs. However, according to a study performed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, from 2011-2014, 46.9% of the population was prescribed a drug in the last 30 days; prescription drugs are an important factor in many peoples’ lives. When portions of the population are displaced from their homes during a natural disaster, they often forget their pill bottles and/or prescriptions. Thankfully, following Hurricane Katrina, regulations were put in place to help people in these situations.

The Baxter Settlement and its Implications for FCA Liability

Kaitlin Lavin Executive Editor Loyola University Chicago School of Law, JD 2017   In January, Baxter Healthcare Corporation (“Baxter”) agreed to pay $18,158 million after the Department of Justice (DOJ) brought suit for violating the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FCDA) and the False Claims Act (FCA). The Baxter case is unique because it was …
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Pharmaceutical Representatives in Chicago Soon to be Subject to Strict Licensing Requirements

Kimberly Seay Associate Editor Loyola University Chicago School of Law, J.D. 2018   On November 16, 2016, the City Council approved an ordinance amending Chicago Municipal Code § 4-6-010(c)(30), which will require the licensing of all pharmaceutical sales representatives in order to endorse pharmaceuticals within city limits and is set to take effect July 1, …
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Could Apple Dive into the Medical App and Device Market Sooner Than We Think and How Will This New Technology Be Regulated?

Amanda Plowman Executive Editor Loyola University Chicago School of Law JD 2017 Alexander Thompson Assistant Editor Loyola University School of Law JD 2018   Apple has had a longstanding interest in breaking into the healthcare industry. Recently, Apple has hired a Toronto physician to work on expanding its health apps and Aetna will now provide …
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Theranos: New Compliance Program Hopes to Save the Company

Gilbert Carrillo Executive Editor Loyola University Chicago School of Law, JD 2017 Edmund Tyrrell Associate Editor Loyola University Chicago School of Law, JD 2018   Theranos, the American health-tech and medical-lab-services company, recently hired two executives to oversee regulatory compliance standards. The executives were hired following Theranos receiving multiple sanctions from U.S. regulators about the …
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