Category:

The Art of Compliance

Dua Lipa is Under Copyright Fire

Singer and songwriter, Dua Lipa has come under two copyright infringement lawsuits over the past month. Both lawsuits allege the pop star’s hit song “Levitating” infringed upon copyrighted work. While the two suits allege infringement against the same song, their outcomes may differ based on the allegation brought forth in each complaint.

Could Anna Delvey Have Gotten Away with It? Bank Vetting for a $22 million Loan

Anna Delvey, the alleged scammer who attempted to obtain financial backing of anywhere from $22 million to $40 million in loans, is once again the subject of much debate due to the new Netflix series chronicling her alleged crimes and other actions. The question this article attempts to answer is whether she ever had a chance of realizing her goal of creating an exclusive, members-only, art club much like Soho House. This question hinges on whether she ever had a real chance to secure the funding to make it possible.

Olympics Sponsors Keep Quiet as the 2022 Games Loom

The 2022 Beijing Olympics will reach millions of people around the world. Despite the Games quickly approaching, the most prominent Olympic sponsors have remained silent about the human rights violations in China. The United States announced the decision to diplomatically boycott the games but athletes will compete.

A Potential Strike May Impact Hollywood

The biggest industry strike among Hollywood production workers since World War II may be impending. On October 4, 2021, the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) announced that members overwhelming granted the union’s president the authorization to strike against the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP). The crux of the demands by the union revolves around increasing workers’ quality of life. Average working days consist of fourteen hours or more, with meal breaks often avoided, leaving little to no personal life outside of the industry.

It’s Not Too Early to Start Worrying About Discriminatory Algorithms in Your Code: A Practical Approach to Self-Regulation

There’s no doubt that remote work, brought on by the coronavirus pandemic, will accelerate the digital revolution already underway. Consumers’ growing appetite to conduct their business online, rather than in-person, has fueled the proliferation of digitally accessible products and services. For instance, movie theaters have closed their doors while content streaming services have experienced exponential growth. And while the restaurant industry, as a whole, has suffered, ‘virtual’ kitchens and grocery delivery apps have picked up steam. A critical question that arises from these trends is “what can be done to eliminate biases in the algorithms that drive these digital transactions?”

A Practical Approach to Post-Schrems II Remediation of Cross-Border Data Transfers to the U.S. and Other “High Risk” Third Countries

On July 16, 2020, the Court of Justice of the European Union (“CJEU”) issued its deafening decision that summarily and immediately invalidated the EU-US Privacy Shield. The regulatory program established between the European Council and the U.S. Dept. of Commerce allowed for the transfer of personal data of EU residents to be sent from the EU to the US without violating the data transfer restrictions of the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”). The decision went on to cast serious doubt on the sufficiency of standard contractual clauses to adequately protect data transferred to any third country, not just the US. Several months later, data exporters in the EU are still sorting through the wreckage of their privacy programs and waiting for practical advice on the way forward.

The Fifth Annual Loyola Journal of Regulatory Compliance Symposium: “Labor & Employment Compliance Issues in the Era of Covid-19”

Friday, March 12, 2021 Symposium Summary This year’s virtual Symposium will bring together practitioners to examine current issues in Labor & Employment compliance with particular attention to issues arising from the Covid-19 pandemic. Practitioners will reflect on a variety of concerns facing employment professionals as advisor, employer, and client. Cost & CLE CLE credit will …
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Understanding the Executive Order on Rebuilding and Enhancing Programs to Resettle Refugees and Planning for the Impact of Climate Change on Migration

Climate change directly and indirectly impacts a range of human rights including the basic rights to life, food, water and housing. Along with all developed countries, the United States has an affirmative obligation to take measures to prevent and address climate change impacts thereby not only mitigating its dire effects, but ensuring that all displaced persons have, at a minimum, their basic needs met. These displaced persons are more often than not those who have contributed the least to climate change and are now disproportionately suffering from its harm. 

How Proxy Access for Shareholders Can Hold Corporations Accountable

Proxy access is not about giving shareholder’s rights, it is about checking C-suite power so that everyone wins instead of just the CEOs. Proxy access has the potential to address some of the pressing issues with corporate power. Corporate power and influence are concentrated in the board of directors, proxy access gives shareholders the opportunity to infiltrate this exclusive “inner circle” of power. Shareholder access to the board can push change towards greater diversity in the boardroom and demand greater transparency and compliance.

New Rules for Illinois Firearms Dealers

The Firearms Dealers License Certification Act (also known as the Combating Illegal Gun Trafficking Act) was signed into law on January 18, 2019 and requires all Federal Firearms License (FFL) dealers engaged in the business of transferring firearms to have their FFL certified by the Illinois State Police. Nevertheless, many areas of the regulations remain in dispute and strong opposition has led to the delay of dates for required compliance. The Act is also being challenged by the Illinois State Rifle Association and a number of gun dealers in Illinois who deem that the Act is an unconstitutional infringement on their right to keep and bear arms.