Working Collaboratively with Students to Evaluate Class Participation

September 13th, 2012 by Jeannette Pierce

Thursday, September 13, 2012 – Noon – 1:00 p.m. – CUNEO 410

Student participation in classroom discussion provides the opportunity for students to integrate material in a more complex way, teaches students to find their voice, and provides the opportunity for students to demonstrate mastery of content.  Faculty often encourage class participation by creating a classroom environment conducive to discussion, presenting a criteria for student participation in the syllabus, and evaluating such participation as a component of the course grade. However such approaches may not appreciate the different backgrounds or goals (e.g., baseline) of our students when they enter the course.   Join Dr. John Orwat, School of Social Work, as he leads a discussion about how faculty and students can work collaboratively to assess and evaluate class participation along multiple dimensions. These include initial goal setting, mid-term review, and final evaluation of class participation grade.

RSVP to Jeannette Pierce (jpierc2@luc.edu or 8-3949) by Monday, September 10th to join us for lunch or to be sent in invitation to join via Adobe Connect at your own computer.

 Commonalities is an ongoing dialogue in support of teaching sponsored by Information Technology Services, The Office of Ignatian Pedagogy and The University Libraries.
http://libraries.luc.edu/commonalities

Articles for today’s session with Dr. Meinhardt: A Matter of Style

February 15th, 2012 by Jeannette Pierce

Here are some articles to review on the topic of teaching citation styles:

http://chronicle.com/search/?search_siteId=5&contextId=&action=rem&searchQueryString=students+citation+styles

This topic was recently highlight in the comic strip Funky Winkerbean:

http://www.seattlepi.com/comics-and-games/fun/Funky_Winkerbean/2012-02-01/

Spring 2012 Commonalities Schedule

January 23rd, 2012 by Jeannette Pierce

February 15, 2012 – Aim & Audience: The Matter of Style Today
Noon, IC Level 4, LSC

Join Dr. Michael Meinhardt as he leads a discussion on the topic of citation styles.  Has the onslaught of tools assisting students in creating bibliographies such as RefWorks, Zotero, EndNote and others helped or harmed your efforts to reinforce good use of style?  How do you stress the importance of good citations to students when it is so easy to copy and paste.  Is correct style a thing of the past?  Join us for a lively conversation about approaches to teaching style in the classroom.

We supply the lunch, you supply the conversation!

 RSVP to Carol Franklin (cfrankl@luc.edu) by February 9th.

 April 16, 2012 – Ethics in the Digital Age
Noon, Terry Student Center Rm. 304, WTC

 Join Dr. Don Heider, Dean of the School of Communications, as he leads a discussion on the topic of the need for digital ethics. Two billion people have used the Internet. The other four billion will soon be users. Who will provide ethical guidance for broadband’s billions of users? There currently exists a leadership vacuum regarding behavior and usage during the largest communication revolution in history.

 Why is such guidance needed?  A few recent incidents may help provide some context:

  •  A Rutgers University freshman takes his own life after his roommate allegedly streamed live video of him engaging in a sexual encounter with another man.
  • A suburban Philadelphia school district is accused of spying on students, with lawyers claiming the district secretly snapped thousands of webcam images of students using school-issued laptops without the pupils’ knowledge or consent.
  • Popular online services such as Facebook and Twitter continue to push the boundaries around what is personal and private information, and what is not. The services mine data from users such as birthday greetings sent and received, school and work gossip, photos of family vacations, and movies watched.

 These cases and many more suggest to us that what is needed is more conversation about how ethics should play a central role in these debates about online behavior and policy.

 Join the discussion at Loyola’s WTC in Room 304 of the Terry Student Center on April 16 at Noon.

 We supply the lunch, you supply the conversation!

 RSVP to Carol Franklin (cfrankl@luc.edu) by (April 11, 2012).

Next Commonalities: Using Mobile Technologies in the Classroom

November 4th, 2011 by Leslie Haas

Join Bruce Montes and Carol Scheidenhelm to discuss using mobile technologies in the classroom to facilitate engagement and learning. Who is using mobile technologies in the classroom? How are they using technologies successfully? How do students feel about the use of these technologies in the classroom? Stop by and hear from your colleagues who are integrating mobile technologies in their classroom. Join us on November 11, 2011 from noon-1:00pm for food and conversation on Level 4 of the Klarchek Information Commons (LSC).

We will supply lunch, you supply the conversation!

Please RSVP to Carol Franklin (cfrankl@luc.edu) by Wednesday, November 9th.

Digital Humanities Quick Reading List

October 24th, 2011 by Leslie Haas

Below are links to more information about the Digital Humanities that will be discussed at Tuesday’s Commonalities Discussion

Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities
http://www.ctsdh.luc.edu/
 
Humanities 2.0
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/features/books/series/humanities_20/index.html
 
“Big Tent Digital Humanities”
http://chronicle.com/article/Big-Tent-Digital-Humanities/128434/
 

The Digital Humanities Revolution is Here!

October 24th, 2011 by Jeannette Pierce

Join Dr. Steven Jones, Professor of English and Co-Director of the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities, for a discussion about the digital humanities–which the Chronicle of Higher Education in 2010 referred to as “the next big thing” and the New York Times has covered in a recent series, “Humanities 2.0″–and its growing presence in higher education. How might the rise of the digital humanities affect the way you teach and the way students learn, including providing new kinds of materials, tools, and assignments, but also providing new kinds of questions for different disciplines? Learn about the recent history of the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities within Loyola, its ongoing research projects, and its new MA program (starting this fall).  Join us on October 25, 2011 from noon – 1:00 pm for food and conversation on Level 4 of the Klarchek Information Commons (LSC).

We will supply lunch, you supply the conversation!

Please RSVP to Carol Franklin (cfrankl@luc.edu) by Friday, October 21st.

 Commonalities is an ongoing dialogue in support of teaching sponsored by Information Technology Services, The Office of Learning and Technology Assessment, and The University Libraries.

E-Textbooks: A Promising Future?

September 26th, 2011 by Leslie Haas

Today’s Commonalities discussion was lively, focusing on the usefulness of electronic textbooks and if they are of interest to faculty and students.    Most of the comments focused on the ease of use and the need for the information to be free of a specific type of device. It has been noted in some articles that the best device is still the laptop, it is preferred by students because of its versatility.  Other areas that were discussed were: access vs ownership, enhancing the information found in the text, how to still have “open book” tests without giving student complete access to the web, cost (still not cheaper than print in some cases), standard books vs customizing content for a class.

The next Commonalities Program will be on October 25 at noon on the 4th Floor of the IC. The topic will be the Digital  Humanities.  More information to follow.

Next Commonalities Discussion Scheduled for Monday at Noon in the Information Commons

September 21st, 2011 by Jeannette Pierce
Hello, on Monday our kick-off discussion will be held on the 4th floor of the Information Commons.  Below are some articles discussing e-books and their place in the classroom.  If you are interested in attending, please RSVP to Carol Franklin at 8-2641.
McKiernan, G. (2011). Configuring the ‘Future Textbook’. Searcher, 19(4), 43-47.
http://vnweb.hwwilsonweb.com/hww/jumpstart.jhtml?recid=0bc05f7a67b1790ee327aeee9ad59645d51b4f93d6eec2ff9133bc38989bcdad6c08309195d8b6d5&fmt=P
Gawelek, M. A. (2011). iPads: Why Mobile? EDUCASE: Mobile Perspectives, 46(2) 28-32.
http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERM1123.pdf
McCarthy, D. (2011). On e-books. E-Reading: The Transition in Higher Education. EDUCAUSE: Mobile Perspectives, 46(2), 21-27. : http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERM1121.pdf

Fall 2011 Commonalities Programming Announced

September 7th, 2011 by Jeannette Pierce

September 26:  Electronic Textbooks
 

Join Dean Robert Seal of the University Libraries for a conversation about electronic textbooks.  What textbook will you be using next semester? Have you considered not using a textbook or relying on electronic books and resources for your classes? How are iPads and Kindles impacting higher education? Your class? What about e-textbooks?  Stop by and hear what your colleagues think about these topics and related trends. Join us on September 26, 2011 from noon – 1:00 pm for food and conversation on Level 4 of the Klarchek Information Commons (LSC). 

We will supply lunch, you supply the conversation!

Please RSVP to Carol Franklin (cfrankl@luc.edu) by Thursday, September 22nd.

October 25:  Digital Humanities
 

 

Join Dr. Steven Jones, Professor of English and Co-Director of the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities, for a discussion about the digital humanities–which the Chronicle of Higher Education in 2010 referred to as “the next big thing” and the New York Times has covered in a recent series, “Humanities 2.0″–and its growing presence in higher education. How might the rise of the digital humanities affect the way you teach and the way students learn, including providing new kinds of materials, tools, and assignments, but also providing new kinds of questions for different disciplines? Learn about the recent history of the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities within Loyola, its ongoing research projects, and its new MA program (starting this fall).  Join us on October 25, 2011 from noon – 1:00 pm for food and conversation on Level 4 of the Klarchek Information Commons (LSC).

We will supply lunch, you supply the conversation!

Please RSVP to Carol Franklin (cfrankl@luc.edu) by Friday, October 21st.

November 11:  Mobile Technologies in the Classroom
 

 

Join Bruce Montes and Carol Scheidenhelm to discuss using mobile technologies in the classroom to facilitate engagement and learning.  Who is using mobile technologies in the classroom?  How are they using technologies successfully?  How do students feel about the use of these technologies in the classroom?  Stop by and hear from your colleagues who are integrating mobile technologies in their classroom.  Join us on November 11, 2011 from noon-1:00pm for food and conversation on Level 4 of the Klarchek Information Commons (LSC).

We will supply lunch, you supply the conversation!

Please RSVP to Carol Franklin (cfrankl@luc.edu) by Wednesday, November 9th.

Commonalities is an ongoing dialogue in support of teaching sponsored by Information Technology Services, The Office of Learning and Technology Assessment, and The University Libraries.

Readings for Third Spaces Discussion

April 12th, 2011 by Jeannette Pierce
The following articles and websites discuss third spaces and their role on campus. 
Hummon, D. M. (1991). The Great Good Places: Cafes, Coffee Shops, Community Centers, Beauty Parlors, General Stores, Bars, Hangouts, and How They Get You Through the Day (Book Review). Social Forces, 69(3), 931. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.
http://flagship.luc.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=9105061648&site=ehost-live
 
Ray Oldenburg. (Biography)  PPS Project for Public Spaces. 
http://www.pps.org/articles/roldenburg/
 
Seidman, Alan. (2006)  Integrating Outside Learning with the Classroom Experience:  The Student Learning Imperative.  Education.  127(1), 109-114.  Retrieved from EBSCOhost. 
http://flagship.luc.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=22826810&site=ehost-live
 
De Vise, Daniel. (2011)  A University of Virginia Student has  a Bright Idea:  ‘Flash Seminars’.”  Washington Post, Sunday, Feb. 20, 2011. 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/20/AR2011022002666.html?referrer=emailarticle
 
Walljasper, Jay.  Big Plans on Campus.  PPS Project for Public Spaces. 
http://www.pps.org/articles/campusbulletin/
 
Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.  (2010)  Creating “Third Spaces”: Promoting Learning through Dialogue.  Voices From the Middle.  18(2), 55-58.
http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=2198029661&Fmt=3&clientId=31822&RQT=309&VName=PQD